Suggestions for Reporting Bullying and School Violence

Every student at your child’s school will benefit from your HELP and INVOLVEMENT. What is happening to one is likely happening to others and causing fear in many.


If your child is experiencing harmful behaviors at school, take it seriously. Report the behavior. It may be classified as bullying, hazing, harassment, a civil rights violation or misconduct according to district policy and state or federal law. It is not up to you to make this distinction before you report.

It is a joint-effort as parents and schools should work together to have bullying stopped. The school has responsibility to:

1. End the Misconduct
2. Eliminate any Harmful Environment
3. Prevent it from Recurring

Remember:
• If a child is in immediate harm, call the Police - 911.

• If your child is feeling suicidal becuase of bullying visit the suicide prevention hotline or call at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You may also contact your health professional or school counselor.

• If your child is sick, stressed, not sleeping, or experiencing other health or emotional problems because of bullying...
Contact your health professional or school counselor.

• If you think that your child is bullied because of their race, sex, ethnicity, or disability (applicable to public schools and schools receiving federal funds) and your school is not responding or solving the problem… contact the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights.

• Some situations may call for legal advice or intervention. And if at any time you determine that legal advice would be helpful or necessary then you should not hesitate to contact an attorney of your choice.

Suggestions:


• Talk with and e-mail the teacher and principal with details.

• Do not advise your child to ignore the behavior or hurt the person who is causing it. Bullying often escalates when ignored and when the target fights back. Encourage your child to report the behavior to an adult at school.

• If repeated, talk with and e-mail the teacher, principal and superintendent with details.
- What happened: when and where, who was involved, who witnessed, what adults have been told and when adults were told
- Impact on your child
- Any perceived climate of fear or disrespect
- Any limit on your child’s ability to participate in and benefit from the school’s education program
- Agreement of what was to be done to stop the behavior, when and by whom

• IMMEDIATELY report any new misconduct to the teacher, principal, superintendent and school board president. Document by e-mail. Your option at any time - and especially if repeated misconduct – is to document with a certified return receipt requested letter.

• Keep a written log of what has been happening and your efforts to get it stopped.

• Maintain communication with your child’s teacher and principal; note their procedures for reporting and resolving complaints and note agreements and instructions in your log. Follow-though.

• Request that applicable state laws, district policies, accreditation standards, federal civil rights protections and best practices be implemented at your school. Offer to help. Note in your log.

• Some situations may call for legal advice or intervention. And if at any time you determine that legal advice would be helpful or necessary then you should not hesitate to contact an attorney of your choice.